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Social Problems of Tobacco Marketing in Southwestern Nigeria: A Behavioral Study

Iyiola , O.O. (2013) Social Problems of Tobacco Marketing in Southwestern Nigeria: A Behavioral Study. Issues in Business Management and Economics, 1 (4). pp. 76-88.

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Abstract

Tobacco industries has always shown much interest in marketing their line of products and have been very successful in portraying smoking as a socially acceptable behavior to billions of people throughout the world. Studies have shown in developed nations that tobacco marketing leads to the onset of smoking among adolescents; in Nigeria no such study has been done. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential influence of tobacco marketing on tobacco consumption and its effects on the society and among residents in the southwestern region of Nigeria. The survey was designed in which thirty-six items, self-administered questionnaire was administered to six hundred people in southwestern Nigeria using a cross-sectional design. The study involved 436 males (72.7%) and 164 females (27.3%). Of these, 336 came from rural areas and 264 came from urban areas respectively. Some 337 respondents (56.2%), indicated that they were influenced by tobacco marketing to smoke, while 263 (43.8%) indicated that they were not influenced. Chi square statistic was used to test the null hypotheses. The result shows a positive significant relationship that supports the notion that tobacco marketing has a positive influence on tobacco consumption in the study areas. This study also revealed that more males in the urban area are being influenced by tobacco marketing to smoke.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Solomon Bayoko
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2013 21:02
Last Modified: 21 Oct 2013 21:02
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/1701

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