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A comparative analysis of Channels TV and CNN's coverage of World News

Igbinoba, Osarieme Angie and Emenike, Ebube Stella (2011) A comparative analysis of Channels TV and CNN's coverage of World News. Journal of Public Affairs, 11 (1). pp. 4-24.

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Abstract

This study did an analysis of the Western and Third world coverage of World News using the broadcast stations (CNN and Channels TV) as case study. In other words, the study sought to examine if the Western and Third World nations are still guilty of imbalance, bias and distortion in their treatment of news. The findings showed that both the North and South nations are guilty of bias and imbalance in their coverage of World News and that each nation seeks to promote their interest rather than a true world interest or the interest of their counterpart nations. The study further revealed that the Third World media still depend heavily on Western media sources for its news albeit their standpoint on the News Flow debate. About 50% of the entire World News stories on Channels TV were sourced 'outside', while about 40% were unidentified. Only 10% were from the in-house personnel. It was also observed that about 55 and 67% of World News coverage by Channels TV and CNN, respectively, were focused on 'bad news'; an age-long controversy that has bedeviled news coverage globally. In view of the foregoing, it has been recommended that there is need for the acceptance of 'imbalance' as a major feature of all media systems as well as a re-evaluation of the standards and values of news evaluation. The rapid industrialization of Third World economies will also go a long way to stop the one-way traffic in international communication which is what encourages media dependence.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
N Fine Arts > NE Print media
Divisions: Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences > School of Humanities
Depositing User: Mrs Hannah Akinwumi
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2015 10:31
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2015 10:31
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/4304

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