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N-Nitrosation of dimethylamine hydrochloride and its toxicology in the wistar rats fed different levels of dietary protein

Akpabio, C. J. and Efuruibe, A. A. and Adeleke, G. E. and Ogunsola, M. O. and Maduagwu, E. N. (2013) N-Nitrosation of dimethylamine hydrochloride and its toxicology in the wistar rats fed different levels of dietary protein. European Journal of Experimental Biology, 3 (2). pp. 94-103. ISSN 2248 –9215

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Abstract

The present study investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of orally administered sodium nitrite (NaNO2) and dimethylamine hydrochloride (DMA–HCL) on liver of rats fed ad libitum with high protein diet (64%), normal protein diet (27%) and low protein diet (3.5%). Thirty Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups and kept for four weeks. Group one was given high protein diet, group two was given a normal protein diet, group three was given low protein diet, all the groups were administered with 3mg NaNO2 and 20mg DMA-HCL/kg, using the application of spectrophotometric analysis, centrifugation, histolopathology, enzymatic as well as colorimetric methods. Liver function test, showed significant elevations (P < 0.05) in the AST, ALT, ALP and GGT activities in all the groups compared with the control animals. The histopathology examination exhibited periportal necrosis. Following UV exposure after in vitro incubation of rat liver microsomal plus soluble fraction with NaNO2 plus DMA-HCL, nitrite concentration in the rats fed high protein was highest 4.033 and 0.470 μg/ml, compared to the control rats which was 0.052 and 0.00192 μg/ml before and after UV irradiation. Nitrite loss was significant (p<0.05) before and after UV exposure in all the groups, indicating that the UV-light has degraded the nitrosamine precursors, thereby inhibiting possible nitrosation. The study has revealed that in rats, a high protein diet enhances N-Nitrosation of dimethylamine hydrochloride, liver derangement and the metabolisms in vivo and in vitro of the resultant compound.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
Depositing User: Mr Adewole Adewumi
Date Deposited: 13 Apr 2015 17:23
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2015 17:23
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/4937

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