University Links: Home Page | Site Map
Covenant University Repository

Effect of Over-seasoned Earthworm Products on Seed Germination: Implication for Early Rain Cropping

Owa, S. O. and Moreyibi, O.H. and Dedeke, G. A. and Morafa, S.O.A. and Senjobi, B.A. (2008) Effect of Over-seasoned Earthworm Products on Seed Germination: Implication for Early Rain Cropping. Journal of Applied Sciences Research, 4 (6). pp. 683-687.

[img] PDF
Download (72Kb)

Abstract

This study was to investigate if residual earthworm products in a soil left to dry up for five months would still be able to stimulate seed germination. Soil pots were treated with different levels of earthworms and planted with Amaranthus seed which grew for 36 days before they were harvested by uprooting. The pots were left to dry for five months simulating the dry season. The levels of germination correlated with the level of earthworm treatments. This suggests that earthworm products survive in the soil during the five months dry season experienced in this part of Nigeria. Leftover earthworm products must therefore be important to seed germination during the early cropping with the first rains before the earthworms populations build up. That the earthworm products improve total germination suggests that they may contain some enzymatic/catalytic component that affects the efficient utilization of the endosperm such that the embryo survives before the depletion of the endosperm. This may be related to the fact that the earthworm produce plant growth hormones that stimulate cell proliferation and elongation in the radicle. Fast development of the radicle ensures stabilization before depletion of the endosperm.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
Depositing User: Mrs Hannah Akinwumi
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2017 10:30
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2017 10:30
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/7805

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item