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WORK ENVIRONMENTS AND RETENTION OUTCOMES OF ACADEMIC STAFF OF STATE UNIVERSITIES IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA

Salau, Odunayo Paul (2017) WORK ENVIRONMENTS AND RETENTION OUTCOMES OF ACADEMIC STAFF OF STATE UNIVERSITIES IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA. PhD thesis, Covenant University, Ota, Nigeria..

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Abstract

The evolving competition in higher education environment has called for implementation of retention strategies to enhance staff performance. Strategies have been put in place by institutions to understand what induces staff performance and retention. Despite the continued efforts for quality work environment, qualified staff still leave and this becomes worrisome especially in the state owned universities. However, the need to retain employees is no longer hidden. What remains controversial is the best method and outcome of staff retention. Therefore, this study established the contributions of work environment determinants on retention outcomes of academic staff of State Universities in Southern Nigeria. The study which was anchored on equity, expectancy and Fredrick Herzberg two-factor theory was cross sectional and descriptive. The study adopted a mixed method (sequential explanatory approach) to elicit information from 384 academic staff that were randomly and purposively selected. The use of questionnaire (quantitative) and structured interview (qualitative) were adopted. The quantitative data were analysed using correlation, regression and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to obtain results, while the qualitative data were subjected to thematic analysis and narrative technique. The results of Kruskal Wallis Test revealed that the difference in the perception of academic staff on the relationship between work environments and retention outcomes by staff status, educational status and years of experience were statistically significant while retention outcomes by gender and marital status were insignificant. The findings indicated that the issue of inadequate and decay of infrastructural facilities have been a concern to the sampled Universities. Many lecturers, including professors, shared offices that are dilapidated, poorly ventilated and furnished. Lecture theatres were observed to be overcrowded and classrooms, laboratories and workshops were shared by many programmes across different faculties. The findings indicate that adequate laboratory equipment and other facilities in the sampled universities especially those in the area of science and technology are not readily available in many campuses and where they are available, they are in state of disrepair. Such situation serves as discouragement, which often encourage them to leave their place of work for another institution with better equipment/facilities. The results indicated an increasing pauperization, varying promotion criteria, erratic power supply, over-congested classrooms and a growing disparity in the ratio between teaching staff and students. Also, teaching effectiveness is not given a great deal of attention in appointment and promotion decisions while the issue of research funding leaves much to be desired. Due to its consequences, strategies for curbing this menace in state Universities, such as creation of enabling environment, adequate funding of tertiary education, non-interference of government in institution’s affairs, effective administration and motivation of staff of the sampled institutions, among others were proffered

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Work environment, Retention, Organisational climate, Reward, Loyalty, Satisfaction, Productivity, Commitment, Involvement
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Divisions: Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Mrs Patricia Nwokealisi
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2017 09:33
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 09:33
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/9516

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