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Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Penicillinase Activity of Staphylococci spp from Wound Specimens in Lagos

Opara, Morrison I. and Egwari, L. O. (2012) Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Penicillinase Activity of Staphylococci spp from Wound Specimens in Lagos. African Journal of Microbiology Research, 6 (2). pp. 3403-3408. ISSN 1996-0808

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Abstract

Forty-five Staphylococci spp comprising 33 (73.3%) Staphylococcus aureus and 12 (26.7%) Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from both non-surgical and post-surgical septic wounds were evaluated for penicillinase activity. Thirty (90.9%) of the S. aureus isolates produced beta-lactamases. Beta-lactamase production accounted for the high level resistance (70-90%) to the penicillins. Five (16.7%) of the penicillinase-producing S. aureus (PPSA) were resistant to methicillin, while 25 (83.3%) PPSA were sensitive. Resistance to the cephalosporins by the PPSA was between 7 and 30% indicating that the beta-lactamase produced was mostly penicillinase. Ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and rifampicin were the most active of the antibiotics against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) with activity of between 90 and 100%. They also gave low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (0.125-8 μg/ml for ciprofloxacin, 0.125-2 μg/ml for vancomycin and 2-32 μg/ml for rifampicin). Methicillin activity of 83.3% was comparable with those of erythromycin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin (range 73.3-86.7%). Azithromycin activity against the PPSA was 90%. S. aureus is the specie of Staphylococci most frequently isolated from septic wound and have shown high rate of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics which could be attributed to their production of beta–lactamase enzyme especially, penicillinase

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antibiotic, susceptibility patterns, penicillinase activity, Staphylococci
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
Depositing User: Mrs Hannah Akinwumi
Date Deposited: 17 Feb 2015 11:47
Last Modified: 17 Feb 2015 11:47
URI: http://eprints.covenantuniversity.edu.ng/id/eprint/3520

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